Elementary Education

Student outcomes for undergraduate programs in Education are aligned with Michigan Standards for Teachers as well as standards from professional organizations. Student learning is assessed using a vast array of informal and formal assessments, ranging from course embedded assessments, performance during field experiences, and MTTC scores. Assessment data is used for ongoing reflection, critique, and further development of our programs. As part of the larger Education Unit, we are in the process of developing and implementing assessments consistent with NCATE accreditation.

Secondary Education

Student outcomes for undergraduate programs in Education are aligned with Michigan Standards for Teachers as well as standards from professional organizations. Student learning is assessed using a vast array of informal and formal assessments, ranging from course embedded assessments, performance during field experiences, and MTTC scores.  Assessment data is used for ongoing reflection, critique, and further development of our programs.  As part of the larger Education Unit, we are in the process of developing and implementing assessments consistent with NCATE accreditation.

Master of Arts in Education

Student outcomes for Graduate programs in Education, including specialization programs in Early Childhood Education, Educational Technology, Literacy Education and Special Education, re aligned with Michigan Standards for Teachers, standards from professional organizations, and ongoing review of current research and literature. Student learning is assessed and evaluated using student portfolios, course embedded assessments, performance during field experiences, and MTTC scores.  Assessment data is used for ongoing reflection, critique, and development of programs of effective programs.  As part of the larger Education Unit, we are in the process of developing and implementing assessments consistent with NCATE accreditation.

Social Work

Student outcome assessment data for the Social Work Program indicated that the four goals of the program are met. Results of four different measures of student performance indicated that the cohort of students completing the 2005-2006 professional block were prepared with the necessary cognitive knowledge, emotional and personal insight, and behavioral skills to claim preparation as a generalist social worker according to the standards of the Council on Social Work Education. Evidence from this assessment also indicates that the cohort of students is exceptionally well prepared when compared to their academic peers nationally.

In an atmosphere of continuous improvement, program administrators are currently developing strategies to assess the experiences of students as they graduate and experience market realities. Future student outcome assessment processes will explore the link between exceptionally strong academic preparation already evidenced, with new observations of licensure, employment and graduate school opportunities not yet directly measured.