HAZCOM & Regulated Waste

Hazardous Waste

EHS is responsible for coordinating the accumulation, transportation, disposal and recycling of hazardous waste at UM-Flint. It is imperative that waste that is determined to be hazardous is handled and disposed of correctly. Individuals are prohibited from disposing of hazardous materials in a dumpster, compactor, down a drain, onto the ground or anywhere else that is not specified within the

UM-Flint’s Hazardous Waste Program.

It is the responsibility of each and every employee and student to ensure that hazardous waste is managed in a safe, responsible and environmentally sound manner. EHS is available to assist departments to determine whether or not they generate hazardous waste.


UM-Flint Campus Hazard Communication (HAZCOM) Guidelines 

GLOBALLY HARMONIZED SYSTEM (GHS)

For UM-Flint departments whose employees work with chemical products or hazardous chemicals, there is new information regarding the Hazard Communication Standard which outlines employer requirements in providing adequate health and safety. OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration) and MIOSHA (Michigan Occupational Safety) have adopted the international Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) as part of the Hazard Communication Standard. The goal of OSHA and MIOSHA adopting the GHS system is to ensure that employers provide health & safety information on hazardous chemicals in a more uniform and structured manner consistent with other countries’ hazardous chemical definitions and labeling requirements, helping to enhance the ease and understanding of this important safety information by employees.

Some of the key changes that come with implementation the GHS system:

  • Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are in a uniform 16 Section Format and are now called Safety Data Sheets (SDS).
  • Manufacturers are required to provide more detailed information on their labels regarding the chemical hazards and use the GHS pictograms to convey the hazards of those.  (See Appendix C of attached guideline)
  • The nine GHS pictograms combine several chemical groups within the given hazard to simplify communication on the hazards (See Appendix E of attached guideline).
  • Training on the new GHS labeling, safe chemical procedures and practices, and other requirements for ALL employees who are covered by the Hazard Communication Standard must be completed by December 1, 2013.
  • The full standard requirements came into effect June 1, 2016.

What this means for UM-Flint:

EHS revised the campus Hazard Communication Guideline (attached) to address new standard requirements.  These revisions are consistent with the recently updated UM-Ann Arbor EHS Guideline for Hazard Communication.

Supervisors of employees who work with hazardous chemicals and chemical products will need to ensure their employees attended GHS Hazard Communication Training.  Supervisors have the option of scheduling a training class with EHS for their employees on a date and time that is convenient for them.  Send e-mail to Dept.EHS@umflint.edu to schedule a class.

Something NEW in this guideline is that departments who use and store chemicals will need to have their own written hazard communication program.  The good news is that there is an easy to use template in the guideline (See Appendix G).  EHS needs to review all departmental Hazard Communication Programs.

Ballast Waste

Generators of ballast waste are required to comply with rules and regulations promulgated by federal, state and local regulatory agencies. The Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA) specifies disposal requirements; the Department of Transportation requires compliance with Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations during transportation of hazardous materials; the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality licenses, inspects and regulates generators, haulers and disposal facilities handling waste.

UM-Flint stores the spent lamp ballast waste within the HazMat Building located in the Hubbard Building parking lot. Facilities and Operations (F&O) contacts EHS at (810) 766-6763 when the waste has to be picked up and disposed of properly.  

The safety guidelines and regulations presented are intended to help generators comply with governmental regulations designed to protect human health and the environment. Strict compliance with these regulations ensures the waste is managed, transported, and disposed of safely and properly, reducing potential liability to the University.

  • All makes and types of ballasts are collected as part of the ballast collection/recycling program.
  • Remove the ballast from the lighting fixture and place it in the properly labeled container.
  • Keep the lid closed on the ballast pail or drum at all times.
  • A yellow Universal Waste label must be affixed to the pail or drum. Fill out the label, including the "Accumulation Start Date." The accumulation start date is the first day that you begin filling the container with ballasts.
  • All ballasts must be shipped for recycling within one year of the accumulation start date. However, ballasts should only be accumulated for 10 months or less to ensure compliance.
  • All light bulbs should be handled and disposed of separately from ballasts.
  • Place any leaking ballast(s) in a sealed bag and place in a separate, properly labeled closed container.
  • Contact EHS at: (810) 766-6763 when you are ready to have your ballast drums collected.

 

Battery Waste

Generators of battery waste are required to comply with rules and regulations promulgated by federal, state and local regulatory agencies. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) specifies disposal requirements; the Department of Transportation requires compliance with Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations during transportation of hazardous materials; the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality licenses, inspects and regulates generators, haulers and disposal facilities handling waste.

The safety guidelines and procedures presented are intended to help generators comply with governmental regulation designed to protect human health and the environment. Strict compliance with these regulations ensures the waste is managed, transported, and disposed of safely and properly while reducing potential liability to the University.

  • All battery types and sizes are accepted in EHS's Hazardous Waste Management Program battery collection/recycling program.
  • All battery pails must have a green "Universal Waste" label affixed to the container.
  • Fill out the label, including the "Accumulation Start Date." The accumulation start date is the first day that you begin filling the container with batteries.
  • All batteries must be sent for recycling within one year of the accumulation start date. However, batteries should only be accumulated for 10 months or less to ensure compliance.
  • After a battery is spent, place the battery in the white pail and replace the lid.
  • Once the pail becomes 2/3 to 3/4 full, contact EHS at: (810) 766-6763 to request collection of the batteries. Replacement pails can be delivered when the full pail is collected.
  • For collections of lead acid batteries, batteries too large to fit in the pails, or the collection of an extremely large number of batteries at once, please contact EHS at: (810) 766-6763 to arrange for a special collection.
  • All waste batteries are to be stored within the HazMat Building until the scheduled waste pick-up dates that are coordinated with Facilities and Operations (F&O).

Biohazardous Waste

Generators of biohazardous waste are required to comply with rules and regulations promulgated by federal, state and local regulatory agencies. The Michigan Medical Waste Regulatory Act regulates the generation, storage, treatment, and disposal of medical waste and administers the Medical Waste Regulatory Program covering medical waste producing facilities. The Department of Transportation requires compliance with Federal Motor Carrier Safety Requirements during transportation of regulated medical waste and the Michigan Department of Energy, Labor and Economic Growth regulates occupation exposure to blood and other potentially infectious material and waste disposal.

The safety guidelines, regulations and procedures presented are intended to help generators comply with governmental rules and regulations designed to protect human health and the environment. Strict compliance with these regulations ensures the waste is managed, transported, and disposed of safely and properly while reducing potential liability to the University.

All containers of biohazardous waste must have a "Biohazard Label" attached. Containers and labels can be ordered through EHS at (810) 766-6763. When waste accumulation begins, the accumulation start date must be written on the label. The accumulation start date is the date the waste is first generated. All biohazardous waste must be treated or sent for disposal through EHS within 60 days.

2016 Bloodborne Pathogens UM-Flint Guidelines

 

 

Bulb Waste

Generators of bulb waste are required to comply with rules and regulations promulgated by federal, state and local regulatory agencies. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) specifies disposal requirements and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality licenses, inspects and regulates generators, and disposal facilities handling waste.

The safety guidelines, regulations and procedures presented are intended to help generators comply with governmental rules and regulations designed to protect human health and the environment. Strict compliance with these regulations ensures the waste is managed, transported and disposed of safely and properly while reducing potential liability to the University.

All types and sizes of bulbs are accepted by EHS.

All bulbs should be carefully packaged to prevent breakage.

Bulbs must be kept in a secure, dry location.

All bulb containers must have a "Bulb Label" affixed to the container. Fill out the label, including the "Accumulation Start Date." The accumulation start date is the first day you begin filling the container with bulbs. Including the building name and type/quantity of bulbs in the container.

Labels are available through EHS.

Stack boxes so that the label is clearly visible during storage.

Bulbs may not be accumulated for longer than one year. Bulbs should only be accumulated for 10 months or less to ensure compliance.

Chemical Waste

Generators of hazardous waste are required to comply with extensive and complex rules and regulations promulgated by federal, state and local regulatory agencies. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requires a "cradle to grave" system of accounting for hazardous waste; the Department of Transportation requires compliance with Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations during transportation of hazardous waste; the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality licenses, inspects and regulates generators, haulers and disposal facilities handling hazardous waste.

The safety guidelines, regulations and procedures presented are intended to help generators comply with governmental rules and regulations designed to protect human health and the environment. Strict compliance with these regulations ensures the waste is managed, transported, and disposed of safely and properly while reducing potential liability to the University.

Use waste containers that are in good condition to ensure that your waste is safely contained while in your possession and during transport.

Attach a completed University of Michigan - Dearborn "Hazardous Waste" label to your container. This helps emergency responders identify your waste containers quickly.

Keep all containers closed expect when adding waste to prevent accidental spills and evaporation.

Contact EHS at (810) 766-6763 within 60 days of accumulation start date to schedule a pick up to ensure that waste is disposed of before 90 days.

Have waste labels visible for inspection.

Provide adequate secondary containment for waste containers so that if your container starts to leak, the spill can be limited from spreading and making the contamination problems larger.

Identify all chemicals and document them on the waste label and manifest so that all of the waste constituents in your container can be identified. This provides guidance for those people handling and disposing the waste as to what hazards may be involved. It also helps emergency responders know what steps to take if they have to respond to an incident involving your waste.

Store waste in a secure location. Ensure it is protected from exposure to weather, vandalism and unauthorized access.

Electronic Waste/E-Waste

Generators of waste consumer electronics (e-waste) are required to comply with rules and regulations promulgated by federal, state and local regulatory agencies. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) specifies disposal requirements and the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality licenses, inspects and regulates generators and disposal facilities handling waste.

The safety guidelines, regulations and procedures presented are intended to help generators comply with governmental rules and regulations designed to protect human health and the environment. Strict compliance with these regulations ensures the waste is managed, transported, and disposed of safely and properly while reducing potential liability to the University.

Property Disposition is responsible for the accountable disposal of University of Michigan property designated as surplus by University departments. They may recycle, sell, or dispose of surplus. Occasionally, Property Disposition will direct the department to EHS to arrange disposal of electronics that have no value. Such electronics are then considered e-waste.

Containers of e-waste must have a green "Universal Waste" label affixed and filled out.

All e-waste must be sent for recycling within one year of the accumulation start date. However, e-waste should only be accumulated for 10 months or less to ensure compliance.

For labels, collections or questions, contact EHS at (810) 766-6763.

Drain Disposal

Your Guide to What Can Go Down the Drain

Pouring other materials (pollutants) down the drain such as chemicals, metals, solids and oils can interfere with the treatment process. For example:

  • Metals and other toxic chemicals. Even small quantities of these substances can be harmful to the environment.
  • Some chemicals 'poison' and kill the microogranisms used in the treatment process.
  • Volatile or corrosive materials damage piping and may endanger the health and safety of workers.
  • Various pollutants can interact with one another, forming more hazardous pollutants. For example, cyanide base reacts with acids, and ammonia and bleach react to form toxic gases.

General Guidelines for Drain Disposal at UM-Flint

Liquids Only - No solids, sludges or viscous materials. No insoluble substances retained by a standard No. 8 sieve or having any dimension greater than 1/2 inch (1.27 centimeters).

No RCRA hazardous wastes - Resource Conservation & Recovery Act; See Characteristic (D-codes) & Listed Wastes (F,K,P and U-codes).Some examples of these RCRA hazardous wastes include:

Corrosives (pH less than 2 or greater than 12.5)

Flammables (flash point less than 140° F)

Oxidizers (e.g., perchloric acid, chormic acid, hydrogen peroxide, etc.)

Metal-containing wastes

Reactive wastes (water, cyanide or sulfide reactive, etc.)

Solvents (halogenated and non-halogenated)

Unused and/or outdated chemicals (P-codes and U-codes)

No Michigan hazardous wastes or liquid industrial wastes - See Michigan Act 451 Part 111 and the Part 111 Administrative Rules for Michigan's hazardous waste information and Part 121 for liquid industrial waste information.

No Radioactive wastes

No Biohazardous, untreated wastes

Property Disposition

The property Disposition office at the University of Michigan is responsible for the accountable disposal of all University of Michigan property, including UM_Dearborn and UM-Flint, designated as surplus by University departments. Their Mission is to recycle, sell or dispose of surplys to the best advantage of the University.