Dr. Mary Jo Kietzman (Gifford)

Associate Professor

Campus Phone: (810) 762-3465

E-mail: mkietzma@umflint.edu


Education

Ph.D., Boston College, 1993

B.A., College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA, 1985

Specializations/Areas of Interest

16th- and 17th-century Literature -- Dramatic and Nondramatic

17th-century Criminal Culture

Early-Modern Women's Writing

Biography

Travel Narrative

Publications/Current Research

Mary Jo Kietzman, "Will Personified:  Viola As Actor-Author in Twelfth Night," Criticism, 54, 2 (Spring 1012), pp. 257-290.



Mary Jo Kietzman, "Doing Shakespeare in a Kazakh College:  Teacher Plays Ethnographer," College Literature:  A Journal of Critical Literary Studies, 40.2 (Spring 2013), 103-129.



Speaking 'to all Humanity': Renaissance Drama in Orhan Pamuk's Snow in Texas Studies in Literature and Language, vol. 52, no. 3 (Fall 2010), pp. 324-353.

 

Mary Carleton, The Literary Encyclopedia, http://www.litencyc.com/

The Self-Fashioning of an Early Modern Englishwoman: Mary Carleton's Lives Aldershot, England: Ashgate, 2004.



"'What is Hecuba to Him or (She) to Hecuba': Lucrece's Complaint and Shakepearean Poetic Agency." Modern Philology 97, 1 (August 1999): 21-45.



"Defoe Masters the Serial Subject." English Literary History 66 (1999): 677-705.



"Montagu's Turkish Embassy Letters and Cultural Dislocation." Studies in English Literature 1500-1900 38, 3 (Summer 1998): 537-51.



"The Fall into Conversation with Eve:  Discursive Difference in Paradise Lost." Criticism 39, 1 (Winter 1997): 55-88.



"Publizing Private History: Mary Carleton's Case in Court and in Print." Prose Studies 18, 3 (December 1995): 105-32.



Courses I Teach

Eng 207 Greek and Roman Classical Literature

Eng 241 Elements of Literary Analysis

Eng 299 Encountering Islam

Eng 312 Renaissance Literature

Eng 315 & 316 Reading and Playing Shakespeare

Eng 317 Writing and Revolution in Seventeenth-Century England

Eng 319 Spenser and Milton: Radicals Making a Tradition

Eng 400 Shakespeare's Theory of Drama Reading

Eng 400 Reading Early-Modern Women