2010-11 Lecture Series

Lorri Glover

“The Founders as Fathers: Family Values and Revolutionary Politics”
Lorri Glover
Friday, October 15, 2010, 4:00PM, Happenings, UCEN

Lorri Glover is the John Francis Bannon Professor in the Department of History at Saint Louis University, where she teaches courses on colonial America, the American Revolution, and gender history. She has written broadly in early American history, focusing particularly on family and the southern provinces. Her recent works include Southern Sons: Becoming Men in the New Nation (2007) and, with Daniel Blake Smith, The Shipwreck that Saved Jamestown: The Sea Venture Castaways and the Fate of America (2008).

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David Blight

"Sesquicentennial Blues: Has Civil War Memory United or Divided America?”
David Blight
Thursday, December 2, 2010, 4:00PM, Happenings, UCEN

David W. Blight is Class of 1954 Professor of American History at Yale University.  As of 2004, he became Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale.  In 2010-11, Blight will be the Rogers Distinguished Fellow in 19th century American History at the Huntington Library.  He is currently writing a book on the anticipation of the Civil War sesquicentennial (2011-15), tentatively entitled “Gods and Devils Aplenty,”  which compares the 100th anniversary of America’s most pivotal event to its 150th.  At the Huntington he will begin work on a new, full biography of Frederick Douglass that will be published by Simon and Schuster by 2013. Blight has written many book and articles on abolitionism, American historical memory, and African American intellectual and cultural history.He is the author of A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom, Including their Narratives of Emancipation, (Harcourt, 2007), and Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory (Harvard University Press, 2001), which received eight book awards. Other published works include a book of essays, Beyond the Battlefield: Race, Memory, and the American Civil War (University of Massachusetts Press, 2002); and Frederick Douglass's Civil War: Keeping Faith in Jubilee (LSU Press, 1989).   Blight lectures widely in the US and around the world on the Civil War and Reconstruction, race relations, Douglass, Du Bois, and problems in public history and American historical memory. He also has been a consultant to many documentary films, including the 1998 PBS series, "Africans in America," and "The Reconstruction Era" (2004).

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Jennifer R. Green

"Was There a Middle Class in the Old South?"
Jennifer R. Green
Friday, February 4, 2011, 4:00PM, Michigan Rooms A & B (UCEN)

 
Jennifer R. Green is Professor of History at Central Michigan University. Her research focuses on class formation and professionals in the nineteenth century, especially using the lens of antebellum education. In addition to numerous articles, she has published Military Education and the Emerging Middle Class in the Old South (Cambridge, 2008), which won the American Education Research Association’s New Scholar Book Award. She just completed an edited volume, The Southern Middle Class in the Nineteenth Century (with Jonathan Daniel Wells, LSU press, forthcoming). She currently serves as Book Review Editor for the Michigan Historical Review.

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