2013-2014 Wyatt Lecture Series

Phone:
810-762-3366
Email:
lfaulkne@umflint.edu
Appalachian State University

Andrea Burns

"'A Place Unique in All the World': The Making and Unmaking of Autoworld"

Friday, February 21, 2014
4:00-6:00pm
Happenings, UCEN
 

Andrea A. Burns received her B.A. in History from Michigan State University, and her Ph. D. in History from the University of Minnesota in 2008. She is currently an assistant professor of public history at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. She recently transformed her dissertation into a book, entitled "From Storefront to Monument: Tracing the Public History of the Black Museum Movement" (University of Massachusetts Press, 2013). Andrea lived in Flint for over twenty years with her family, and graduated from Powers Catholic High School.

Phone:
810-762-3366
Email:
lfaulkne@umflint.edu

Peter Morris

"How Baseball Became America's National Pastime and Michigan's Game"

Friday, March 14, 2014
4:00-6:00 p.m.
Happenings, UCEN

 

Peter Morris of Haslett, Michigan, is the award-winning author of Baseball Fever: Early Baseball in Michigan, A Game of Inches: The Stories Behind the Innovations that Shaped the Game, and five other critically acclaimed books about baseball's early history. Peter is well-known for his research with the Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) Biographical Research Committee. In addition he has won the SABR Henry Chadwick Award and has twice won the Seymour Medal.

Phone:
810-762-3366
Email:
lfaulkne@umflint.edu
University of Texas at San Antonio

Andrew Highsmith

"Re-Thinking the Narrative of Corporate Abandonment: General Motors and the Politics of Metropolitan Capitalism in Flint, Michigan"

Tuesday, October 22, 2013
4:00-6:00 p.m.
Happenings, UCEN
 

Andrew Highsmith is Assistant Professor of Public Administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio. His scholarly work focuses on social inequality and metropolitan development in modern American history. He received his Ph. D. in U.S. history from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor in May 2009. Highsmith's dissertation, "Demolition Means Progress: Race, Class, and the Deconstruction of the American Dream in Flint, Michigan," won the 2009 John Reps Prize for Best Dissertation in American Planning History from the Society for American City and Regional Planning History and the Urban History Association's Best Dissertation Award for 2009. Highsmith is also the auther of Demolition Means Progress: Flint, Michigan, and the Fate of the American Metropolis, a forthcoming book from the University of Chicago Press (2014). His most recent pulbication, "Prelude to the Subprime Crash: Beecher, Michigan, and the Origins of the Suburban Crisis," appeared in the Journal of Policy History in October 2012. A former resident of Flint's Mott Park neighborhood, Highsmith now lives in Braunfels, Texas, with his wife and their three children.