2014-15 Wyatt Lecture Series
Phone:
810-762-3366
Email:
lfaulkne@umflint.edu

David Tôbaru Obermiller

"Okinawa and the US Military Base Industrial Complex: An Issue of Ethnic Nationalism"

Friday, September 26, 2014, 4 p.m.
260 French Hall

David Tôbaru Obermiller is an Associate Professor of History at Gustavus Adolphus College. He also teaches in the Program of Japanese Studies and in Environmental Studies. Obermiller received his M.A. from the University of Iowa in History and Asian Languages and Literature. In 2006, he recieved his Ph.D. from University of Iowa in History. He recently published an article titled "Dreaming Ryūkyū: Shifting and Contesting Identities in Okinawa" in Japan Since 1945: From Postwar to Post-Bubble (Bloomsbury Press, 2013)

Phone:
810-762-3366
Email:
lfaulkne@umflint.edu

George Kosho Finch

"Symbols of Enlightenment"

Friday, October 24, 2014, 4 p.m.
Happenings, 1st Floor UCEN

A Detroit native, George Finch received his B.A. in International Relations and East Asian Languages from James Madison College at Michigan State University. In 2006, he received his Doctor of Jurisprudence from Wallamette University College of Law. He started his religious studies in Shingon Buddhism in 2000 at California and Mt. Kōya, Japan. His Buddhist education continued until 2009, and he is an ordained Shingon Buddhist priest. Kosho is his Buddhist name. Kosho has founded two organizations, 1) the Foundation for Shingon Buddhism that promotes Shingon Buddhism and 2) Practice Balance, which is a non-profit organization focusing on health maintenance and mindful practices.

Phone:
810-762-3366
Email:
lfaulkne@umflint.edu

Franklin Odo

"Asian Immigration Issues: The Japanese in Hawai'i and the Continent"

Friday, November 14, 2014, 4 p.m.
Happenings, 1st Floor UCEN

Franklin Odo was Fouding Director of the Asian Pacific American Center at the Smithsonian Institution and Chief of the Asian Division, Library of Congress. Odo was on the faculty when Asian Americn Studies was established at UCLA. He taought at the University of Hawai'i, U Penn, Hunter College, Princeton, and Columbia. His book, No Sword to Bury: Japanese Americans in Hawai'i during World War II, was published by Temple University Press in 2004; he edited the Columbia Documentary History of the Asian American Experience, published by Columbia University Press in 2002. Voices from the Canefields: Folksongs from Japanese Immigrant Workers in Hawai'i was published by Oxford in 2013. He has a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Asian American Studies and a Distinguished Serivce Award from the Asian American Justice Center. Odo was Humanist in Residence at the John Nicholas Brown Center for Public Humanities at Brown Universiyt in April 2013. He currently leads a "Theme Study on Asian American Pacific Islanders" for the National Historic Landmarks Project of the National Park System.