Flint has a story to tell. Here's more about ours.

The University of Michigan-Flint's efforts in response to the water crisis are just beginning. It is part of our unending mission to apply knowledge and resources in the service of this community. That service is multi-facetted, and since 1956 UM-Flint has expressed its commitment in all areas of the community, across all disciplines. The following is a cross section of recent examples of the University of Michigan-Flint's mission in action.

University of Michigan-Flint Prepares for Major Investment, Growth

UM-Flint downtown expansion

Two major expansions for the University of Michigan-Flint are just days from being finalized. The University is in the process of buying a former FirstMerit Bank building for $6 million and accepting a donation of the Riverfront Residence Hall and Conference Center, a $15.5 million value. The two properties are along Saginaw Street in downtown Flint and are adjacent to the current campus. Together, they increase campus space by 500,000 square feet—a 25 percent increase in the University’s downtown footprint. The addition of a second on-campus residence hall means UM-Flint has the potential to grow from 300 to 800 students in campus housing. These are just two recent examples of UM-Flint investment in its community to support increased student access. Also, the University recently reopened the downtown ice rink—which had sat as a vacant concrete slab for more than 25 years. Skating is free and open to the public. The reopening of the rink has been hugely popular.
 
For an interview with Chancellor Susan E. Borrego:
Marjory Raymer | University Relations
Phone:  (810) 237-6570
Email: wismarjo@umflint.edu
More on UM-Flint investments:

Flint’s Rising Appeal with International Students

Livingstone and friends

Look around. The University of Michigan-Flint is a magnet for international students with growing appeal worldwide. The number of international students at UM-Flint has skyrocketed over the last decade, growing from just 54 international students in 2005 to 720 in 2015. In fact, 1 in every 12 students at UM-Flint is an international student. They hail from all corners of the globe, including 261 from India and 5 from Bangladesh. The spike in international students was driven in part by the addition of residential housing to campus in 2008. Their impact has been huge. It is estimated that international students alone contribute $13.5 million annually into the Flint and Genesee-area economy and they have enriched the community by bringing diversity, world views and their cultures to downtown Flint. International students also are leaders on campus—last year the Student Government President was from Mauritius (a small island country off the southeast coast of Africa)—and among the most active student ambassadors. In Flint, many international students are finding opportunity, an affordable world-class education, and love for a community that welcomes them warmly.
 

UM-Flint international student expert: 
Daniel Adams | International Center director*
Phone:  (810) 762-0867
Email: dadams@umflint.edu

More on UM-Flint International Students:

https://www.umflint.edu/international/international-center-home​

* Can also assist with contacting international students

Leaving Southern California for a Great Opportunity in Flint

UM-Flint Chancellor Susan E. Borrego at opening of Ice Rink

Before becoming Chancellor of the University of Michigan-Flint, Sue Borrego was a homeless teen who managed to graduate from her downriver Detroit high school only because a friend’s family took her in.
 
At the age of 16, she became an emancipated minor—but the love of reading carried Borrego to college, which she really attended mostly as a way to escape. Borrego swore she’d never return to Michigan. She moved west, studied, earned her master’s and then doctorate, and became a nationally-renown leader and advocate for student success, diversity, and inclusion. Along the way, she married and had 2 children, divorced and came out of the closet, planted her roots in Southern California, married her partner Mary Boyce, and became “Nana” to four grandchildren. Then, she was introduced to Flint, Michigan.
 
Here she saw a community of strength and resiliency. Here she saw raw determination and she saw something familiar. She knew access to education made all the difference in her own life, and she knew UM-Flint provided that opportunity here in Flint. She saw an opportunity to build pathways to higher education, provide student support to increase graduation rates, and build partnerships to transform the community. Borrego became the seventh chancellor of the University of Michigan-Flint in August 2015.
 
For an interview with Chancellor Borrego: 
Marjory Raymer | University Relations
Phone:  (810) 237-6570
Email: wismarjo@umflint.edu
 
More on Chancellor Borrego:

UM-Flint Leads State in Education Innovation

GEC students in class

They say necessity is the mother of invention. Confronted with long-declining population and state funding, and the ever-increasing obstacles educators in all poor communities face, the necessity for schools in Flint to think outside the box existed well before the water crisis. The University of Michigan-Flint and its K-12 partners have been at the forefront, experimenting with new models, new teacher training initiatives, and new efforts of every size and shape in their mission to improve educational outcomes for Flint area students. UM-Flint currently has 9 Dual Enrollment Educational Partnerships with area school districts—which allows high school students to attend college at reduced or no cost. This year, the program launched in Flint Community Schools with 20 students. There also is a high school called Genesee Early College located right on the UM-Flint campus. Designed for students interested in STEM professions, GEC students can earn up to 60 free, transferable college credits while earning a high school diploma. The Smart Teachers As Role Models (STAR) program addresses educational inequities within the elementary and secondary schools of Genesee County, including the under-represented number of African-American males employed as teachers.
 
UM-Flint education expert: 
Bob Barnett, PhD | Dean, School of Education and Human Services
Phone: 810-766-6878
Email: rbarnett@umflint.edu
Website: https://www.umflint.edu/sehs
More on UM-Flint’s Innovative Education Initiatives: