GENERAL INFO

Dr. Jeremiah Olson

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
French Hall 220L, University of Michigan-Flint
Email: jerolson@umich.edu  |  Phone: (980)-621-4950

WHAT I'M READING, Spring 2015

Education

Ph.D., Political Science, Awarded May 2013
University of Kentucky
Major Fields: Public Policy, American Political Institutions
Committee: Richard Waterman (chair), Richard Fording, Mark Peffley and Nicolai Petrovsky (Martin School of Public Policy and Administration).

Master of Public Administration, May 2008
University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Bachelor of Arts, Political Science, August 2006
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Minor: Women’s Studies

Academic Positions

Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science,
University of Michigan at Flint, August 2015 to present

Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Government,
Franklin and Marshall College, August 2013 to 2014

Graduate Assistant, Department of Political Science,
University of Kentucky, August 2009 to 2012

Graduate Assistant, Department of Political Science and Public Administration,
University of North Carolina at Charlotte, August 2006 to 2008

Courses Taught

Undergraduate
Understanding Public Policy, Political Environment of Public Administration, American National Government, Sex, Drugs and Politics

Graduate
Public Administration Ethics, Organizational Theory, Research Design

Conference Presentations

“Race and Health Care Provision Inside Prison,” presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, January 9-11th, 2014, New Orleans, Louisiana

"Social Construction and the Treatment of American Prison Inmates," presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, January 3-5th, 2013, Orlando, Florida.

“Punitive Views and Punishment Decisions: Representative Bureaucracy in US State Prisons,” presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, April 12-15th, 2012, Chicago, Illinois.

“When the President Acts: Bureaucratic Responsiveness to Presidential Executive Orders” (with Yu Ouyang) accepted for presentation at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, April 12-15th, 2012, Chicago, Illinois.

“Beyond the Imprisonment Rate: The Impact of Race and Politics on Inmate Treatment in State Prisons,” (with Richard C. Fording) presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, September 1-4, 2011, Seattle, Washington.

“Beyond the Imprisonment Rate: The Impact of Race and Politics on Inmate Treatment in State Prisons,” (with Richard C. Fording) presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, January 8th, 2011, New Orleans, Louisiana.

Grants

• Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program 2015, University of Michigan, Flint
• Research Grant. 2012. University of Kentucky, Graduate School ($3,000)
• Research Grant. 2012. University of Kentucky, Department of Political Science ($750)
• Research Grant. 2012. University of Kentucky, Department of Political Science ($500)
• Travel Grant. 2011. American Political Science Association ($400)
• Travel Grant. 2010 and 2011. University of Kentucky Graduate School ($400)
• Travel Grant. 2011. University of Kentucky Department of Political Science ($400)

Professional Affiliations

• American Political Science Association
• Midwest Political Science Association

PUBLICATIONS

The teleprompter presidency: comparing obama's campaign and governing rhetoric 

(with Yu Ouyang, John Poe, Austin Trantham and Richard Waterman). Social Science Quarterly

Objectives: Are the skills presidents require to be elected the same skills they will need once they assume office? Is there a change in rhetoric between presidential campaigning and presidential governing? The objective of this article is to examine those questions.
Methods: We compare candidate Barack Obama's campaign speeches with his governing speeches to determine if his rhetoric on the campaign trail provides the basis for his later governance. We compare speeches on certainty, positivity, and inclusiveness.
Results: We find that, in general, Obama's campaign and governing rhetoric are consistent, suggesting that he used the rhetoric of the campaign to help build a basis for governance. We find no statistical difference in the level of certainty or inclusiveness that he used before or after taking office.
Conclusions: We conclude that most differences between presidential campaign rhetoric and governing rhetoric, at least in the case of Barack Obama, seem to be caused by the specifics of the political environment.

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RACE AND MENTAL HEALTH CARE PROVISION INSIDE PRISON

Research Summary: This article uses a survey of nearly 15,000 prison inmates to examine patterns in mental healthcare provision. There is a significant treatment gap for all inmates. In addition, race and ethnicity is an important predictor of mental health care provision. Black, Hispanic and American Indian inmates were less likely to participate in important forms of mental health care including mental health counseling and substance abuse treatment.
Policy Implications: The United States disproportionately incarcerates black and Hispanic Americans. This paper suggests that disparate treatment continues in the form of differential mental health and substance abuse counseling. Lack of treatment inside prison may contribute to further negative interactions between black and Hispanic former inmates and law enforcement.

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race and punishment in american prisons

Abstract: American prison staff face the difficult challenge of maintaining order in an often overcrowded, potentially dangerous environment. Prison staff are given wide discretion over treatment decisions inside prisons, including the various means of using punishment. Adding to the discretionary nature of the prison setting, staff are forced to make quick decisions in an uncertain environment, and are likely to use commonly understood heuristics to simplify their decision-making. These heuristics include stereotypes about race and criminality. This article uses data on over 10,000 prisoners to examine the determinants of one of the harshest punishments available, the use of solitary confinement in American prisons. Consistent with the broader literature on race and criminal justice, I find that black inmates report higher rates of placement in solitary confinement than white inmates.


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