Livingston County Schools Program Offerings

The Livingston County School districts (Brighton, Fowlervile, Hartland, Howell, and Pinckney) are partnering with the University of Michigan-Flint to offer the Dual Enrollment Educational Partnership. The DEEP initiative allows motivated students to earn college credit by taking accredited courses taught by UM-Flint faculty. Livingston County is currently offering five DEEP programs.

Business/Economics Program (12 Credits)

Classes are taught at the Hartland Educational Service Support Center (afternoon).

ECN 201, Principles of Economics-Macroeconomics, 3 credits - Social Sciences. Introduction to the principles of economic organization and national income determination and stabilization.  Topics include inflation, unemployment, money and banking, and the economic role of government.

BUS 110, Business Concepts & Careers, 3 credits. Comprehensive overview of basic business concepts and business protocol. Foundations of general business management, human resources management, operations management, marketing, accounting, finance, and their interdependent nature. Job search techniques, writing resumes, job interviewing, establishing personal relationships.

ECN 202, Principles of Economics-Microeconomics, 3 credits - Social Sciences. Introduction to the economic theories of production, consumption, and exchange.  Topics include applications of supply and demand, production and cost analysis, market structure, market failure, resource markets, and regulation.

BUS 115, Introduction to Business Applications, 3 credits. Focus on development of skills in the use of business technology, including spreadsheets, database management, and presentation software; financial computing; web-based business data sources and their ethical use.

Pre-Engineering Program (13 Credits)

Classes are taught at Hartland High School (afternoon).
 
CSC 174,  Programming and Problem Solving for Engineers - 3 credits. Introduction to problem solving using both MATLAB. Basic procedural programming concepts including input/output, branching, looping, functions, file input/output, and data structures such as arrays and structures. Basic linear algebra concepts such as matrix operations and solving sets of equations, and numerical methods such as least squares solutions and their use for curve fitting. 
 

EGR 165, Computer Aided Design, 3 credits - Technology. The goal of this course is to familiarize engineering students with fundamental principles of computer aided design and perform basic engineering analysis, such as stress and deflection using solid modeling and parametric design using Pro-Engineer software.

CSC 175, Problem Solving & Programming I, 4 credits - Technology. This course introduces students to the structured programming language C++ which is essential for engineering applications and problem solving.  Programming language concepts, arrays, structures, and subprograms will be included.

EGR 102, Introduction to Engineering, 3 credits - Technology. This course introduces students to various engineering disciplines, and common engineering science foundations of all branches, teaming ethics, and communication.  Fundamental principles of various engineering disciplines will be taught using one central problem from each discipline.

General Studies Program (12 Credits)

Classes are taught at the Hartland Educational Service Support Center (afternoon).

COM 204, Argumentation & Debate, 3 credits - Humanities. Basic instruction in public argumentation and debate. Students develop research skills and learn to construct and deconstruct arguments. Includes participation in debates.

POL 120, American National Government & Politics, 3 credits—Social Sciences. Theory and practice of democratic government in the United States and the institutions and processes of American government as manifestations of democratic values. Representative democracy, federalism, the Presidency, Congress, the Courts, political parties, interest groups, and voting as an expression of, and at times contradictions to, democratic values.

PHL 101,  Introduction to Philosophy, 3 credits - Humanities. Examination of some of the main questions of philosophy, how they arise, and methods of answering them, based on the works of selected authors. Relationships between philosophical themes and other facets of cultural expression. Presentation of simpler problems in nontechnical language designed to introduce the student to philosophical inquiry. 

POL 329, Civil Liberities & The Constitution, 3 credits Social - Sciences. Civil liberty issues confronting American society. Rights of freedom of speech, assembly, and press; the religion clauses of the First Amendment; the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment as it is concerned with rights of minorities. Students deliver oral arguments and prepare briefs of pending and simulated court cases. Prerequisite:  POL 120 or consent of instructor.

 

Medical Science Program (13 Credits)

Classes are taught at Hartland Educational Service Center (afternoon).

HCR 206, Health Sciences Applications, 2 credits. Introduction to a wide range of topics in health science with demonstrations of how basic scientific concepts can be applied to solving problems in the field.  Hypothetical thought experiments stimulate students’ interest in pursuing health careers.

BIO 113, Principles of Biology, 4 credits. Introduction to the basic principles of biology relating to cell structure and function, cell reproduction, and mechanisms underlying patterns of inheritance, ecology and evolution, emphasizing guided discovery and critical thinking.

BIO 328, Genetics, 4 credits. Principles of inheritance from molecular through population levels. Gene action, cytoplasmic inheritance, parthenogenesis, mutation, and homeostasis.

PHL  202, Intro to Logic, 3 credits. Study of reasoning with emphasis on features that distinguish good (or valid) reasoning from bad (or invalid) reasoning. Examination of ways of evaluating deductive reasoning with focus on techniques of formal, symbolic logic. May also include informal logic and fallacies.

School of Management Business Program (12 Credits)

Classes are taught at Brighton High School (afternoon).

BUS 110, Business Concepts & Careers, 3 credits. Comprehensive overview of basic business concepts and business protocol. Foundations of general business management, human resources management, operations management, marketing, accounting, finance, and their interdependent nature. Job search techniques, writing resumes, job interviewing, establishing personal relationships.

BUS 115, Introduction to Business Applications, 3 credits—Technology. Focus on development of skills in the use of business technology, including spreadsheets, database management, and presentation software; financial computing; web-based business data sources and their ethical use.

EIM 340, Introduction to Entrepreneurship, 3 credits. Broad overview of the entrepreneurial process with emphasis on starting a new business.  Entrepreneurial thinking and self-evaluation of personal prospects for entrepreneurship; different paths to starting a business; risks and rewards of becoming an entrepreneur.

BUS 250, Contemporary Legal Issues for Business, 3 credits—Social Science. Legal environment of business and principles of law involved in contracts and agency.

Application and Submission Deadline

DEEP applications are available in your high school guidance office. You may also download a copy of the application. 

In order to receive full consideration, the application must be completed, signed (parent and student signature required), dated and submitted with updated high school transcripts to your high school guidance office.