Advising

The Department of Psychology takes seriously its responsibility to provide undergraduate students with access to courses, research opportunities, and advisers. As partners in your academic success, the department staff encourages you to take time to fully explore the information and links we have provided for you. By becoming an informed student, you will have control of your progress toward your degree.

Some of the most common issues we can help you with include:

  • Academic advising for the psychology major/ minor
  • Giving recommendations for courses related to your interests
  • Providing transfer student information
  • Coordinating petitions
  • Confirming Graduation status

All psychology majors and minors are strongly encouraged to meet with an Academic Advisor at least once each semester. This will help to ensure that you are on track with your academic plans and program requirements. Students are only advised in person; Academic Advisors do not give information or offer advising over the phone or via email. This procedure ensures that you are fully informed of your academic status, and receive accurate information on your progress toward graduation.

Advising Appointments

We encourage you to schedule an appointment if you have questions or concerns associated with navigating the Psychology major or minor. Remember, the primary role is to guide the student through the process of completing both the departmental and university requirements for a Psychology degree. 

All questions relating to the program of study and degree requirements should be directed to the assigned advisor for that program.  Visit our programs of study pages for additional information for each Psychology program.

For scheduling an advising appointment, please contact via email or by phone:

Lesa Callcut

Administrative Assistant

Department of Psychology

530 French Hall

(810) 762-3424

General Education Requirements

General Education Program

Please visit the UM Flint Catalog for more information regarding the General Education Program

General Education requirements apply to all students pursuing first bachelor’s degrees at the University of Michigan-Flint.  Students should plan to satisfy these requirements as early as possible to allow flexibility in completing program and upper division requirements.

Program Requirements

The General Education Program consists of requirements in four components: First Year Experience, English Composition, Distribution and Suite Options, and Capstone Experience. 

I. UNV 100:  First Year Experience (FYE).
Three credits in courses designated applicable to the First Year Experience requirement.  The letters FYE immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicates that the credit applies to the First Year Experience General Education requirement.  This course is multidisciplinary in approach and exposes students to multiple perspectives of a particular theme. These topics can vary broadly but all make connections between local, national and global issues.  In addition, students learn how to navigate through the university community and are introduced to research and information literacy skills that will benefit them throughout their academic careers.  Students entering the university with fewer than 25 credit hours must fulfill the FYE requirement within their first academic year. Please refer to the schedule of classes for specific sections and topics.

II. English Composition.
Completion of ENG 112 or the equivalent. This requirement is ordinarily satisfied by ENG 111 and 112 (or EHS 120).  Some students will need additional credits in ENG 100 and ENG 109 to complete the requirement.  Reading test scores and a writing placement exam are used to determine placement.  See the English Department pages for more information on reading placement.  Based on their performance on the Writing Placement Exam, all incoming students and transfer students who do not transfer in sufficient applicable writing credits will be placed in the appropriate starting course: ENG 109 for 3 credits, ENG 109 for 1 credit concurrent with ENG 111/112, ENG 111, or ENG 112 (only students with previous applicable credit for ENG 111 are eligible for any ENG 112 placement).  Writing Placement Exam performance will not exempt students from ENG 111 or ENG 112 but rather will determine if additional help through ENG 109 is needed during or before completing the ENG 111 and ENG 112 sequence.  Transferring students must have completed a sufficient number of credits in writing courses that meet the stated outcomes of UM-Flint’s writing courses to fulfill the English Composition requirement.  Students transferring from schools on the quarter system must in most cases have completed three quarters of appropriate composition courses in order to fulfill the English Composition requirement.  Students selected for the Honors Program ordinarily satisfy this requirement by completing HON 155 and HON 156.  The University strongly recommends that students complete this requirement as early as possible in their first 45 credit hours of coursework.

III. General Education Distribution and Suite Options.
The General Education program at the University of Michigan–Flint is designed to encourage all students to gain an understanding of the world around them, to be capable of informed decisions and actions, and to effectively communicate their reasoning to a wide audience.  The program provides both basic knowledge of the components of society and a framework upon which future knowledge can be added.  Students will learn important skills essential to becoming lifelong learners and contributors to society at all levels of community: city, region, nation, and world.
Students will select courses or suites of courses that fulfill the requirements in humanities, social science, global studies, fine arts, health and well-being, finance and quantitative literacy, natural science and technology.  The credit requirement for each category is designated in the table at the end of this section, and is outlined below:

Humanities (H). 
Humanity courses explore multiple understandings of the human condition. These courses use ideas, stories, and words to help us make sense of our lives by addressing dilemmas and acknowledging ambiguity and paradox.  Six credits in courses designated as applicable to the Humanities requirement.  The letter H immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.

Social Sciences (S). 
Social science courses focus on people and the institutions within which they interact as individuals, and in groups, societies, nations, and states. These courses analyze social structures and processes or cultural meanings associated with collective human interactions.  Six credits in courses designated as applicable to the Social Sciences requirement.  The letter S immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.

Global Studies (GS). 
Courses in Global Studies develop awareness of global issues, and the diversity of cultures and languages, perspectives, histories, lived experiences, and values. These courses help students understand diverse political and societal realities by addressing social, cultural, political, economic, or historical factors.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Global Studies requirement.  The letters GS immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.

Fine Arts (F). 
Courses whose primary focus is the creation, re-creation, and study of creative processes in the visual and performing arts that reflect cultural development and growth, as well as the current and historical trends of global cultures through aesthetic concepts.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Fine Arts requirement.  The letter Fimmediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.

Health and Well-Being (HW). 
Courses in health and well-being develop an awareness of health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. These courses focus on exploring multiple dimensions and multiple social determinants of health including diverse domestic and global health practices, issues and policies.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Health and Well-Being requirement.  The letters HW immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.

Finance and Quantitative Literacy (FQ). 
Finance and Quantitative Literacy courses develop quantitative reasoning skills that can be applied effectively in life and work across multiple domains.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Financial and Quantitative Literacy requirement.  The letters FQ immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.

Natural Sciences (N/NL). 
Natural Science courses focus on the scientific method(s), principles, concepts, models and experimentation, as well as the limitations of such endeavors, to explore natural phenomena to advance a better understanding of the natural world. These courses include laboratory experiences to further develop a student’s understanding of the scientific method, observation skills, and experimental methods and techniques.  Four credits in laboratory science courses designated as applicable to the Natural Sciences requirement.  The letters N and/or NL immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.  Note: Applicable credits must include at least one credit with N/NL designation, indicating laboratory experience.

Technology (T). 
Technology courses develop knowledge and understanding of technological processes and systems, and their interrelationship with life, society, or environment. Courses will focus explicitly on technology or the use of technology to solve complex problems.  Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Technology requirement.  The letter Timmediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement. 

IV. Capstone Experience (CAP). 
Three credits in courses designated as applicable to the Capstone requirement.  The capstone will foster synthesis of knowledge gained through general education.  Furthermore, it will promote coherence and relevance of general education to the major.  The letters CAP immediately following the credit parentheses of a course indicate that the credit applies to this requirement.  

Click here for the General Education Worksheet.

Psychology Degree Requirements

Applied Psychology

The Program in Applied Psychology is designed to provide intensive pre-professional training to prepare the student for direct application of principles and practices of psychology to community problems or for graduate education in human service areas of psychology or other applied disciplines. The program offers a balance between theoretical/empirical and practical skills.

Applied Psychology Program Requirements

 
General Psychology

The General Program in Psychology is designed for the student who is preparing for advanced study in professional psychology or a related field, as well as for the student with a general interest in human behavior.

General Psychology Program Requirements

 
Research Psychology

The Bachelor of Science Program in Research Psychology is designed for students who are preparing for doctoral level study or professional medical education.  The curriculum is intended to develop in students the general skills and knowledge of psychology principles expected in research-oriented graduate programs.  The general track prepares students for study in areas such as animal behavior, biological psychology, clinical psychology, cognition, developmental psychology, learning, social psychology, personality, and other areas emphasizing empirical research.  The pre-medical track is tailored to serve students interested in attending medical school.

Research Psychology Program Requirements

 

Research Psychology Pre-Med Concentration

The Bachelor of Science Program in Research Psychology is designed for students who are preparing for doctoral level study or professional medical education.  The curriculum is intended to develop in students the general skills and knowledge of psychology principles expected in research-oriented graduate programs.  The general concentration prepares students for study in areas such as animal behavior, biological psychology, clinical psychology, cognition, developmental psychology, learning, social psychology, personality, and other areas emphasizing empirical research.  The pre-medical concentration is tailored to serve students interested in attending medical school.

Research Psychology Program Pre-Medical Concentration

 

Psychology Honors Program

Prospective Honors Program students are urged to acquaint themselves as early as possible with the requirements below as well as with the particular procedures for acceptance into the Psychology Department’s Honors Program. See the departmental honors advisor, or the Honors Program Director for this information.

Psychology Honors Program (BA or BS) Requirements

 

Psychology Minor and Teacher's Certificate

The Psychology Minor Program and the Teacher's Certificate Minor in Psychology Program are currently being revised to allow for greater flexibility in course selection. Please meet with a Psychology Faculty Advisor to learn more about this process. The following are the current (yet to be revised)  Psychology Minor Program and Teacher's Certificate Minor in Psychology Program requirements.

Psychology Minor Program Requirements

Teacher's Certificate Minor in Psychology Program Requirements

 

Social Sciences Joint Program

Social Sciences Joint Program Requirements

Psychology 4-Year Sample Plan

The following sample four-year plan is designed to assist students in their long-term academic planning. Please note that specific courses fulfilling University General Educaton Requirements are suggestions. While these courses complement the Psychology major, others will also. Please consult with your Psychology advisor before making any choices.

The goal of this sample plan is to help students see how the requirements of prerequisites, major course requirements, general education, electives, and minor course requirements can be woven together effectively to allow for on-time graduation. Each student’s actual course of study will vary, based on their interests, placement exams, beginning semester of study, transfer or AP credits, etc. This is why seeing an academic advisor in your major department is critically important.

See the Psychology Sample 4-Year Plan here.